World History Curricular Requirements

  • The course includes a college-level world history textbook, diverse primary sources, and multiple secondary sources written by historians or scholars interpreting the past.
  • Each of the course historical periods receives explicit attention.
  • Students are provided opportunities to investigate key and supporting concepts through the in-depth study and application of specific historical evidence or examples.
  • Students are provided opportunities to apply learning objectives in each of the themes throughout the course.
  • The course provides balanced global coverage, with Africa, the Americas, Asia, Oceania, and Europe all represented. No more than 20 percent of course time is devoted to European history. — Geographic Coverage
  • Students are provided opportunities to analyze primary sources and explain the significance of an author’s point of view, author’s purpose, audience, and historical context. — Analyzing Primary Sources
  • Students are provided opportunities to analyze and evaluate diverse historical interpretations. — Analyzing Secondary Sources
  • Students are provided opportunities to compare historical developments across or within societies in various chronological and geographical contexts. — Comparison
  • Students are provided opportunities to explain the relationship between historical events, developments, or processes and the broader regional, national, or global contexts in which they occurred. — Contextualization
  • Students are provided opportunities to explain different causes and effects of historical events or processes, and to evaluate their relative significance. — Causation
  • Students are provided opportunities to identify and explain patterns of continuity and change over time, explaining why these patterns are historically significant. — Continuity and Change Over Time
  • Students are provided opportunities to articulate a historically defensible and evaluative claim (thesis). — Argument Development
  • Students are provided opportunities to develop and substantiate an argument using historical reasoning, considering ways diverse or alternative evidence could be used to support, qualify, or modify the argument. — Argument Development

World History Resource Requirements

 
  • The school ensures that each student has a college-level world history textbook (supplemented when necessary to meet the curricular requirements) for individual use inside and outside of the classroom.
  • The school ensures that each student has copies of primary sources and other instructional materials used in the course for individual use inside and outside of the classroom.
  • The school ensures that students have access to support materials for the AP World History course, including scholarly, college-level works that correspond with course topics; as well as standard reference works such as encyclopedias, atlases, collections of historical documents, and statistical compendiums, either in a school or public library or via the Internet.
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