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College Board

The CollegeKeys Compact

Innovation Awards Submission Form

The College Board Advocacy & Policy Center is determined to make college access and success a reality for all students, including those from low-income backgrounds. The objective of the CollegeKeys Compact is to identify, share, and expand programs and practices that address the needs and challenges of low-income students and help them get ready for, get into, and get through college. Each year, 18 Compact members are eligible to receive special recognition for their innovation and effectiveness in increasing the percentage of low-income students who get ready for, get into, or get through college successfully. Winning submissions will be awarded $5,000 to help expand or sustain their program. Information about submitted practices will be posted online at www.collegeboard.org/collegekeys and shared through electronic and print publications for potential implementation at other organizations.

The deadline for submissions to be considered for the 2013 Innovations Awards program is 11:59pm EDT, Sept. 28, 2012. Previous recipients of Innovation Awards will not be eligible for an award in the same category (Getting Ready, Getting In, Getting Through), but are encouraged to submit in a new category. Initiatives must have been in effect for a minimum of 12 months to be considered for an award.

For more details about the CollegeKeys Innovation Awards program, please visit www.collegeboard.org/collegekeys.

NOTE: The submission form cannot be saved; we recommend you work on your submission as a word document, and cut and paste your responses into this form.

* Required Information

Part I

Contact Information

Is your institution/organization a member of the CollegeKeys Compact? * Yes

If not, please visit www.collegeboard.org/collegekeys to join. Only Compact members may submit effective practices and be considered for the Innovation Awards program.

Who should we contact if we have questions about this submission?

Institutional Information

What grade levels does the institution/organization serve? (Check all that apply.) *

Ungraded
Pre-K-12
K-12
K-5
6-8
9-12
2-years postsecondary
4-years postsecondary
Graduate-level studies
Other
If other, please specify:
What is the total number of students enrolled/served for this academic year?*
Which of the following best describes the institution/organization? *
Which of the following best describes the area served? *

Effective Practice Information

Getting Ready: Effective practices for getting ready are designed to ensure that more low-income students are ready to go to college when they graduate from high school. Getting Ready programs focus on college aspirations and expectations as well as academic preparation and support.

Getting In: Effective practices for getting in are designed to make enrollment and full participation in college life possible for low-income students. Getting In programs focus their efforts on: helping students and families understand and navigate the admissions and financial aid processes; implementing student aid that meets the financial needs of low-income students; and creating recruitment plans that use a holistic admissions evaluation process.

Getting Through: Effective practices that assist students in getting through college are intended to provide essential academic, social and emotional support. Getting Through programs highlight advising, mentoring, personal development, assessment, instruction, community support, retention, and/or transfer of low-income students.

Please select the appropriate category for your submission:*
How long did it take to develop the initiative from concept to implementation?*
How long has the initiative been in operation? *

(Please note a minimum of 12 months is required. If your initiative has been in effect less than 12 months, we invite you to submit next year.)
How many students have benefited?*
What is the annual per-student cost to implement?*

How is the program funded?*

In 300 words or less, please describe the effective practice, including its goals, the need
or challenge it seeks to address, and the target audience. *

How do you measure the success of the practice? Please provide specific quantitative
measurements to demonstrate that progress is being made toward the initiative's goals. *

Please also provide specific qualitative measurements to demonstrate that
progress is being made toward the initiative's goals.*

What elements of the approach are particularly unique, innovative and/or effective in
expanding options for low-income students?*

Do you foresee that the initiative will still be in operation in two years? If not, why?
How will it be funded in the future?*

Please list any collaborating organizations or partners and indicate their role and/or contribution.

Effective practices will be considered for recognition based on the following criteria:

  • Relevance: Alignment to the principles and priorities outlined in the Compact to prepare and support students and families from low-income backgrounds for college success.
  • Innovation: New, creative and sustainable strategies for addressing identified needs of students from low-income backgrounds to advance the goals of the Compact.
  • Impact: Demonstration of meaningful progress toward stated goals of the initiative through qualitative and quantitative measures.
  • Potential: Opportunity for replication and adaptation by other educators, institutions and policymakers.

Please describe how your effective practice addresses each of these criteria. *

In 200-300 words, please describe how you would use the recognition and the $5,000
award to enhance or expand on this effective practice, if selected. *

Part II

Inventory

Getting Ready: Preparation Implemented In Progress Planned Not Applicable
Partnering with school systems and high schools to help them align high school completion standards with the requirements for success in first-year college courses.
Collaborating with school systems to recruit, prepare, and support new teachers to work in targeted schools serving low-income communities.
Providing content area professional development for English language arts, mathematics, and science teachers.
Partnering with middle and high schools to offer students and their parents/guardians a continuum of college and career exploration and counseling activities, including a college awareness curriculum, campus visits, and assistance completing admissions and financial aid applications.
Training teachers and counselors in the basics of college planning, admissions, and financial aid.
Providing/expanding dual enrollment and bridge programs to help students make successful transitions to college.
Supporting school efforts to provide academic support for students challenged in college-preparatory courses, including tutoring and reading, math, and study skills development.
Other (Please describe)

Part II

Inventory

Getting In: Admissions and Financial Aid Implemented In Progress Planned Not Applicable
Expanding efforts to recruit students from low-income backgrounds into the admissions applicant pool.
Establishing fee-waiver programs that cover special prematriculation expenses such as college admission application and acceptance deposits, housing deposits, orientation program fees, etc., for income-eligible students.
Giving greater emphasis to noncognitive factors in reviewing admissions applications of students from low-income backgrounds (holistic admissions review).
Adopting realistic student expense budgets that include all relevant educational costs.
Recognizing the unusual hurdles that students from low-income backgrounds face, when assigning levels of self-help (e.g., expected student loan, work-study, or contributions from summer savings).
Meeting the full need of students from low-income backgrounds with a reasonable mix of grants, work, and loans.
Increasing the institutional commitment to need-based aid for students from low-income backgrounds by
(a) dedicating a share of new tuition revenue money each year; or
(b) committing a share of auxiliary enterprise profits (e.g., licensing/ trademark revenue, or student stores revenues); or
(c) dedicating earned income from unrestricted endowed sources for aid targeted to students from low-income backgrounds.
Establishing financial aid policies and practices that are known to foster matriculation, engagement, and retention by
(a) offering the same proportion of grant aid to transfer students as is awarded to other students;
(b) exercising discretion in granting ?on-time? applicant status to students from low-income families who miss the aid application deadlines the first year;
(c) implementing a "promise"-type program specifically targeted to students from low-income families to increase the certainty of available aid;
(d) simplifying and clarifying aid eligibility standards; and
(e) providing sufficient aid so that students from low-income backgrounds may participate in field trips, and study abroad programs, as do their more affluent peers.
Other (Please describe)

Part II

Inventory

Getting Through: Achievement and Success Implemented In Progress Planned Not Applicable
Implementing articulation agreements between two- and four-year institutions to ensure that students can achieve a baccalaureate degree without unnecessary duplication of course work.
Providing social activities, advisement, and support that affirm students? cultural, linguistic, and social backgrounds.
Integrating academic support services/skills instruction into the teaching and learning curriculum in first-year college courses, which may include
(a) tutoring;
(b) supplemental instruction; and/or
(c) living/learning communities and similar efforts.
Implementing comprehensive personal and academic support services for at-risk students, which may include:
(a) developmental or remedial education programs for underprepared students;
(b) supplemental instruction;
(c) peer-assisted academic support for students in introductory "gatekeeping" courses with traditionally high failure rates;
(d) tutoring and mentoring;
(e) academic, career, and personal counseling;
(f) financial literacy instruction and guidance; and/or
(g) assessments and special services for students with disabilities.
Implementing an early warning system that actively monitors student performance, intervenes when students experience academic difficulty, and follows up on student progress.
Adopting academic policies that create a path for restoration of academic eligibility (once lost), subject to "learning contracts" or other commitments to fully utilize campus academic and personal support services.
Adopting financial aid policies and practices known or intended to further student success and increase graduation rates. Examples include
(a) ensuring that the amount of grant aid in a student's financial aid package is sufficient to encourage continued enrollment (persistence);
(b) exercising discretion in granting "on-time" aid applicant status;
(c) providing grant funding for summer school for low-income students who need to restore academic eligibility;
(d) providing short-term loans or supplemental funds for unexpected or unusual allowable personal expenses (e.g., medical, car repair, learning disabilities testing, etc.); and/or
(e) creating a "second chance" whereby institutional or private funds are used to "cure" defaulted student loans, thus restoring federal student aid eligibility.
Other (Please describe)

Part II

Inventory

Getting Ready: Preparation Implemented In Progress Planned Not Applicable
Establishing the expectation that all students are capable of success in rigorous college-preparatory courses in high school.
Encouraging students to take rigorous college-preparatory courses, including honors, AP®, IB, and dual enrollment courses.
Teaching students the habits of mind and academic behaviors and expectations required for high achievement in rigorous high school and first-year college courses.
Providing students with academic skill-building workshops to help them develop their understanding of course content, reading and study skills, and the habits of mind needed to succeed in rigorous course work.
Providing safety-net structures in the form of tutoring, mentoring, and study groups designed to support academic success for students experiencing challenges with mastering rigorous course content.
Implementing/supporting systems for helping students establish an individualized academic plan for college readiness and putting in place a monitoring and engagement system for assisting students on achieving the plan.
Providing all students a continuum of college and career exploration and counseling activities, including college and career-awareness workshops, campus visits, and exposure to careers that require college degrees.
Providing families with the information and resources needed for them to support their children?s college aspirations and planning.
Offering students age-appropriate campus experiences beginning in elementary school and continuing through high school.
Arranging for all students from low-income families to take the PSAT/NMSQT® or PLAN at no cost.
Providing test-preparation workshops and free access to online admissions prep-test modules for students from low-income backgrounds.
Informing income-eligible students of the availability of fee waivers for admissions tests, AP tests, and college and financial aid applications.
Providing students with a college "coach" who can support their college aspirations and assist them with planning and applying for college and financial aid.
Providing bridge programs to support students in making successful transitions from middle to high school.
Advocating for policies at the federal, state, and local levels to foster college aspirations and expectations for students from low income backgrounds.
Other (Please describe)

Part II

Inventory

Getting In: Admissions and Financial Aid Implemented In Progress Planned Not Applicable
Establishing mentoring programs and partnering with colleges to help students from low-income backgrounds with admissions and financial aid processes.
Preparing mentors, volunteers, and parent leaders to provide college-planning information and assistance to students from low-income backgrounds and their families.
Training administrators, teachers, and counselors in the basics of college planning, admissions, and financial aid for students from low-income backgrounds.
Training for counselors and teachers in assisting students with completion of application processes for college admissions and financial aid.
Informing income-eligible students of the availability of fee waivers for admissions tests, AP tests, and college and financial aid applications.
Providing students with a college ?coach? who can support their college aspirations and assist them with planning and applying for college and financial aid.
Providing bridge programs to support students in making success transitions from high school to college.
Developing a monitoring and engagement system managed by an identified counselor or other professional for guiding students through the college application and financial aid application processes.
Helping students apply on time for need-based aid.
Other (Please describe)

Part II

Inventory

Getting Through: Achievement and Success Implemented In Progress Planned Not Applicable
Providing bridge programs to support students in making successful transitions from high school to college.
Providing information, mentoring, and other ongoing support to the students we send to college.
Serving as an ongoing resource for students and families regarding college requirements, managing college costs, and various aspects of campus life.
Providing career-related mentors, internships, and summer jobs for low-income students.
Conducting follow-up studies of high school graduates about their college experience and of the academic performance of students from low-income backgrounds.
Using feedback from high school graduates from low-income backgrounds about their college experiences and challenges to improve college preparation and planning resources.
Other (Please describe)

Part II

Inventory

Getting Ready: Preparation Implemented In Progress Planned Not Applicable
Promoting policies at the federal, state, and local levels to foster college aspirations and expectations for students from low-income backgrounds.
Making the college-prep curriculum the default requirements for high school graduation.
Aligning middle school completion standards with the requirements for success in high school college-preparatory courses.
Aligning high school curricular standards with the standards for success in first-year college courses.
Opening college credit courses to all interested students, including AP®, IB, and dual enrollment.
Establishing the expectation that all students are capable of success in rigorous college-preparatory courses in high school.
Providing safety net structures, in the form of tutoring, mentoring, and study groups, designed to support academic success for students experiencing challenges with mastering rigorous course content.
Providing professional development for teachers and counselors to gain skills and knowledge needed that will sensitize them to the cultural, linguistic, and learning modalities of a diverse student population.
Providing professional development workshops for teachers, counselors, and other school staff about how their beliefs affect the college-going aspirations and achievement of students from low-income backgrounds.
Arranging for all students to take the PSAT/NMSQT® or PLAN at no cost.
Giving the PSAT/NMSQT to all students and using the experience and resulting data to develop/expand the college-going culture and develop individual plans for skill building.
Informing income-eligible students of the availability of fee waivers for admissions tests, AP Exams, and college and financial aid applications.
Offering all students a continuum of college and career exploration and counseling activities, including a college awareness curriculum, campus visits, and exposure to careers that require college.
Providing families with the information and resources needed for them to support their children's college aspirations and planning.
Providing all students with a college "coach" who can support their college aspirations and assist them with planning and applying for college and financial aid.
Developing systems to identify underperforming students early and accelerate their learning in college-preparatory courses.
Developing systems for helping students establish an individualized academic plan for college readiness and put in place a monitoring and engagement system for helping students achieve their plan.
Providing test-preparation workshops and free access to online admissions prep-test modules for students from low-income backgrounds.
Other (Please describe)

Part II

Inventory

Getting In: Admissions and Financial Aid Implemented In Progress Planned Not Applicable
Helping students from low-income backgrounds apply on time for financial aid.
Training administrators, teachers, and counselors in the basics of college planning, admissions, and financial aid for students from low-income backgrounds.
Providing training for counselors and teachers in assisting students with completion of application processes for college admissions and financial aid.
Putting in place a system for providing assistance to students who complete the required processes for admissions and financial aid, but who might still need additional counseling support from a school professional to make the transition from high school to college a reality.
Establishing mentoring programs and partnering with colleges to help students from low-income backgrounds with admissions and financial aid processes.
Preparing mentors, volunteers, and parent leaders to provide college-planning information and assistance to students from low-income backgrounds and their families.
Developing a monitoring and engagement system managed by an identified counselor or other professional for guiding students through the college application and financial aid application processes.
Other (Please describe)

Part II

Inventory

Getting Through: Achievement and Success Implemented In Progress Planned Not Applicable
Conducting follow-up studies of high school graduates from low-income backgrounds about their college enrollment and academic performance.
Using feedback from high school graduates from low-income backgrounds about their college experiences and challenges to improve college preparation and planning resources.
Other (Please describe)

Part II

Inventory

Getting Ready: Preparation Implemented In Progress Planned Not Applicable
Developing and implementing policies that establish the expectation that all students are capable of success in rigorous college-preparatory courses in high school.
Making the college-preparatory course sequence the core curriculum required for high school graduation.
Aligning middle school completion standards with the requirements for success in high school college-preparatory courses and high school graduation standards with the requirements for success in first-year college courses.
Establishing certification policies that require teachers to have the content knowledge and pedagogy to enable students from low-income backgrounds to complete academically challenging course work.
Reviewing certification requirements for administrators, teachers, and counselors to insure that preparation programs include college readiness for students from low-income backgrounds.
Providing leadership for integrating data systems to track the progress of students from middle schools through a college degree.
Monitoring and publishing data that indicate progress toward the goal of college readiness for all students.
Establishing P?16 Councils to galvanize stakeholders across sectors in planning and implementing efforts to improve college readiness and success of students from low-income backgrounds.
Convening leaders from business, higher education, K?12 community, and faith-based organizations to persuade them of the need to prepare all students for college.
Providing support for income-eligible students to take the PSAT/NMSQT®, PLAN, college admission and AP®/IB examinations, and dual enrollment courses at no cost.
Identifying and disseminating actions that leaders from all sectors can take to build public support for preparing all students for college participation and success.
Supporting a continuum of college and career exploration activities for students, including a college awareness curriculum, campus visits, summer enrichment programs, and exposure to careers in knowledge-based fields.
Organizing college access marketing campaigns to motivate students to take actions to prepare and plan for college.
Providing families with the information and resources needed for them to support their children's college aspirations and planning.
Other (Please describe)

Part II

Inventory

Getting In: Admissions and Financial Aid Implemented In Progress Planned Not Applicable
Establishing holistic admissions policies in considering students' applications for admissions.
Encouraging colleges to include students from low-income backgrounds in building their recruitment plans.
Creating need-based financial aid policies and processes that are predictable and easy to understand, and that reinforce students? preparation for college.
Adopting realistic student expense budgets that include all relevant educational costs.
Advocating for increased state commitment to need-based aid and other state policies that ensure that the full need of students from low-income backgrounds is met.
Increasing the state's commitment to need-based aid versus merit aid, and making every effort to meet the full need of students from low-income backgrounds.
Encouraging institutions to develop provisional admissions programs that permit underprepared students to enroll on the condition that they participate in a structured program with intensive monitoring and support during the first year.
Rewarding institutions that balance their mission between excellence and equity, and maintain a quality education for all while demonstrating a commitment to access for low-income populations.
Allocating supplemental payments (per capita grants for operating revenues) to institutions that identify and serve students from low-income families.
Developing a blueprint for shared responsibility for college financing, identifying an estimate of what is needed as the state?s investment for each of the next five years, and keeping this measure in front of the legislature.
Asking institutions to fund the first semester of each student?s need—complementing federal aid—then funding on a reimbursement basis for each student who continues to be enrolled for each subsequent term (paying for performance/incentive funding).
Establishing school?college partnership programs to help students from low-income backgrounds with admissions and financial aid processes.
Supporting campaigns to help families of students from low-income backgrounds to understand college admissions and financial aid opportunities and the actions their children need to undertake to get ready for, plan for, and succeed in college.
Other (Please describe)

Part II

Inventory

Getting Through: Achievement and Success Implemented In Progress Planned Not Applicable
Simplifying the renewal processes for state need-based aid for students.
Implementing strategies to improve student retention and success.
Requiring institutions to report retention and graduation rates by income.
Ensuring that state transfer articulation policies are transparent and facilitating the movement of students from two-year to four-year institutions.
Conducting public hearings on research findings that inform policy about why students succeed and fail at higher education institutions; focusing on effective practices that are research based.
Allocating supplemental payments to institutions for each at-risk, low-income student who successfully progresses from the freshman to the sophomore year.
Funding research studies that demonstrate to the legislature the value of the state?s investment in need-based aid and/or student support services.
Creating incentives to reward universities for serving the dual missions of access and excellence.
Developing a reward system for institutional "accountability" and "performance" that acknowledges differences in inputs and measures the quality of outputs in terms of the value added.
Providing financial literacy programs for families and students to broaden their understanding of how to manage college costs and the benefits of reasonable borrowing for college.
Other (Please describe)

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